The Lovetones

lovetones
This psychedelic Australian quartet sounds like the summer of ’68. A cross between the Moody Blues and Tame Impala with John Lennon vocals. Any of their albums would serve as the perfect soundtrack for the lazy daze of August.

“Journeyman”

“The Party’s Over”

Caveman

caveman

“A Country’s King Of Dreams”
“December 28th”
“Easy Water”

Brooklyn-based quintet Caveman deliver an ambitious, sprawling take on indie pop by drawing influences from experimental rock, post-rock, wistful indie rock, and African music traditions — balancing varied elements like four-part harmonies, tribal drums, trickling keyboards, and hazy guitars with inspired results.

Reminds me of: Grizzly Bear, Real Estate, Wild Nothing, The Shins, Lord Huron

The Way to Be Cool

“While mainstream society of the 2000s (decade) had been busying itself with reality television, dance music, and locating the whereabouts of Britney Spears’s underpants, an uprising was quietly and conscientiously taking place behind the scenes. Long-forgotten styles of clothing, beer, cigarettes and music were becoming popular again. Retro was cool, the environment was precious and old was the new ‘new’. Kids wanted to wear Sylvia Plath’s cardigans and Buddy Holly’s glasses — they reveled in the irony of making something so nerdy so cool. They wanted to live sustainably and eat organic gluten-free grains. Above all, they wanted to be recognized for being different — to diverge from the mainstream and carve a cultural niche all for themselves. For this new generation, style wasn’t something you could buy in a department store, it became something you found in a thrift shop, or, ideally, made yourself. The way to be cool wasn’t to look like a television star; it was to look like as though you’d never seen television.”
— Matt Granfield, HipsterMattic

Good Field

Good_Field

Good Field sounds timeless, as though they could have existed during the wonder years. They’re organic… analog – not perfect instrumentalists like the digital crowd. Listening to their self-titled debut album, you’ll hear the acoustic curlicue whimsy of Grizzly Bear and the foot stomping field funk of The Band. Your ears are sure to reap a good yield.